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High School Football

Always full throttle: Taciturn Scott lets his play do the talking

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    Trevor Scott lines up for a play against Wickliffe.

    NICK CAMMETT / GAZETTE

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    Trevor Scott.

    NICK CAMMETT / GAZETTE

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Black River center/inside linebacker Trevor Scott has mastered the one-liner, mainly because no one expects him to talk in the first place.

A scene could unfold like this: Scott is in the field house lifting with fellow O-linemen Mitchell Young and Cole Haswell, analyzing the conversation and waiting for the perfect moment to strike.

Scott gets everyone’s attention with a quick, sarcastic sentence that is likely in the ballpark of, say, five words. Laughter ensues before the process repeats.

Scott isn’t a big talker, and that’s exactly why he fits in well with a team full of big personalities as the third-seeded Pirates (11-1) prepare to take on top-seeded South Range (12-0) in the Division V, Region 17 championship tonight at Northwest.

“You’ll just fall over and laugh,” Haswell said. “That dude’s hilarious. The only way I can say it is slapstick humor. It’s just one of those things where you hear him and you kind of stop and go, ‘What did you just say?’ and then you realize it and just start laughing.”

Just two years ago, the coaching staff didn’t know which direction Scott was heading. At 5-foot-8, 165 pounds, he was neither physically ready to play varsity nor fast enough to change positions. He was a classic tweener, and it was up to him to shed the label.

Scott responded in the only way he knows how. He kept quiet, showed up every day — mostly after school, but sometimes before — to lift with Haswell and Young and kept getting stronger despite not gaining more than 15 pounds.

Flash forward to tonight and the 5-11, 180 senior is a member of the 1,200-pound lifting club (225 bench, 375 squat, 460 deadlift and 225 power clean) and will make his 23rd start at center, where he’s been nearly perfect on snaps and knocks heads with tackles who are sometimes 100 pounds heavier.

“After my sophomore year, I told myself I was going to become a way better football player,” he said. “I was in here with Cole Haswell and Mitch Young every single day after school and, once baseball season came, every day at 6 o’clock in the morning. The weight room changed me.”

Like smaller teammates Justin Zacharyasz and Garrett Hord, Scott revels in opponents underestimating him. It only takes a play or two to establish that he’s not going anywhere, especially when he cracks a foe directly under the facemask with all-out hustle.

Sometimes that leads to a whiffed block or a poor angle, but success happens far more often than not.

“Roughneck,” Young said. “There’s no other way to describe him.”

Wickliffe can attest to that after losing to Black River 44-6 last week.

On offense, Scott neutralized 6-3, 275 Blue Devils tackle Jared Szinte, a four-year starter and first-team All-Northeast Lakes District selection. On defense, Scott had seven tackles, including one for loss and a half-sack, and the hit of the Black River season when he blitzed untouched like a runaway freight train and stuck his helmet into quarterback Brad Dieterich’s ribs to force an incompletion.

Scott hadn’t recorded a defensive statistic since dinging a shoulder Week 8 against Brookside — Travis Sexton played well in his absence — and it was obvious that Scott played angry.

“I played my hardest every play,” said Scott, who’s fourth on the team with 59 tackles. “I didn’t think about it. I just played.”

Scott will face another all-district nose tackle tonight, as 5-10, 200 South Range sophomore Anthony Cszap is a gap-shooting specialist. Scott will be a critical defensive player, too, against the Raiders’ spread-option attack that makes opponents pay for mental mistakes.

Don’t expect any trash talk, but don’t expect anything less than hard-hitting play, either.

Scott lets his game do the talking as the trigger man for the most prolific rushing team in Medina County history.

“That kid,” Haswell said, “is 100 mph all the time.”

Contact Albert Grindle at (330) 721-4043 or agrindle@medina-gazette.com.



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