Sunday, September 23, 2018 Medina 49°
Advertisement

Local Medina County News

MEDINA COUNTY FAIR: Tough collaborating with sheep

  • 23413371

    Becca Rogers, left, 16, of Wadsworth, and sister Ashley, 18, are showing off their market lambs at the Junior Fair Sheep Show Tuesday at the Show Arena.

    LYDIA MAINZER / GAZETTE

  • 23419677-4

    Bob Hare, left, judges the market lamb entries in market class six Tuesday at the Junior Fair Sheep Show at the Medina County Fair.

    LYDIA MAINZER / GAZETTE

  • 23419674-3

    Spectators flock to the Show Arena Tuesday night at the Medina County Fair for the Junior Fair Sheep Show to cheer on members of Medina County 4-H clubs.

    LYDIA MAINZER / GAZETTE

Advertisement
23413371

Becca Rogers, left, 16, of Wadsworth, and sister Ashley, 18, are showing off their market lambs at the Junior Fair Sheep Show Tuesday at the Show Arena.

LYDIA MAINZER / GAZETTE Enlarge

MEDINA — Showing animals isn’t easy, just ask exhibitors in the Junior Fair Sheep Show at the Medina County Fair.

Alexis Zgrabik, 18, of Seville, said she’s been showing sheep for the majority of her 4-H career.

“The hardest part of showing lambs is getting the animal to work with you exactly how you want them to, when you want them to,” Zgrabik said.

The Junior Fair Sheep Show, which lasted about 4 1/2 hours Tuesday night, filled the Show Arena with family, friends, exhibitors and livestock animals.

There are four divisions: market lamb, sheep breeding, sheep showmanship and the wool show. Ninety market lambs were shown and the show displayed the hard work of approximately 60 exhibitors.

This year’s judge was Bob Hare from Winchester. A 35-year 4-H adviser, Hare has judged in 26 states.

Zgrabik was awarded grand champion overall breeding ewe lamb and seventh place overall market lamb. However, she believes there are other things besides winning.

“It is truly amazing that an organization like 4-H teaches you so many life lessons, many you don’t realize right away, and I am extremely thankful for that,” she said.

Wadsworth’s Ashley Rogers, 18, and her sister, Becca, 16, agreed that the hardest part of the day is working with the animals in the arena and the specific logistics of showing.

The Rogers sisters may not have shown sheep as long as Zgrabik, but said they are having fun participating and working with their animals.

Becca said the most rewarding part is “seeing all your hard work pay off in showmanship or in your class.”

Ashley said she is “learning with my friends and having fun doing it.”

Zgrabik and the Rogers sisters said they believe the experiences and memories of 4-H surpass the ribbons and prizes exhibitors may receive.

The Medina County Sheep Committee assists exhibitors year-round and is known as a resource for the community. Members help exhibitors show their animals at events like the Junior Fair Sheep Show.

The committee is comprised of Melissa Synk, Rod Sulzener, Krystal Smith, Gene Sulzener and Ben Smith. Volunteers include Karissa Kelling and Ellie Siedel.

Junior Fair board members in attendance included Alexis Letner, Zander Throckmorton, Lizzie Cauley, Leah Stidham and Scott Hitchcock. Their responsibilities were announcing the results, recording the placings and helping the sheep committee.

Messages may be left for Lydia Mainzer at (330) 721-4060.


Click to view comments
Advertisement
Advertisement
To Top

Fetching stories…