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Brunswick explores asphalt options

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    Brunswick is researching a paving method called asphalt overlay. If used, it will be used primarily on residential roads.

    ALYSSA ALFANO / GAZETTE

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    Brunswick is researching a paving method called asphalt overlay. If used, it will be used primarily on residential roads.

    ALYSSA ALFANO / GAZETTE

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BRUNSWICK –– Brunswick Engineer Matt Jones said Monday that the city is looking into a process for road repairs called asphalt overlay, which is when a new layer of asphalt is placed on top of a damaged layer of asphalt or concrete instead of removing and replacing the damaged surface.

“We’re just looking at it as an additional tool,” Jones said. “We haven’t made any decisions for certain as to whether or not to utilize it.”

Jones said he is unsure of the costs involved with the overlay process. However, he believes it is cheaper than ripping out and completely replacing a concrete street. There are some drawbacks as the surface life of the overlay is not as long as reconstruction.

“We did a citywide review of pavement conditions,” Jones said. “It’s a number-based system that was done by a pavement maintenance expert. We’re still analyzing that data to come up with the best solution for whether or not asphalt overlays would be viable option on our streets. We are looking into it.”

Jones said the city is almost done going through the data collected by the pavement maintenance expert.

“Every street is reviewed in the field and there are particular things you are looking for as far as types of deterioration,” he said.

“And every street gets ranked with a number between one to 100 with 100 being the best and one being the worst.”

If the asphalt overlay process is used, it will only be used throughout neighborhoods.

“The number of streets can vary pretty widely,” Jones said. “It depends of the amount of area that we have to cover on a particular street.”

Jones said the city’s road levy will allow Brunswick to funnel between $700,000 and $800,000 into road projects this year. That money is used in conjunction with other funding streams to maximize impact.

On average, the city juggles about 30 road projects a year and adding the asphalt overlay option into the mix will allow for greater flexibility.

As it stands from earlier budget discussions, there are several road projects not related to Monday’s talks in the works for 2019.

This includes Laurel Road from Brintnall Drive to Pinewood Drive. This is a reconstruction project with a price tag of $1,065,940. The city anticipates receiving a grant from the state for $613,940 to help fund this project.

There is also the South Industrial Parkway project, which starts at Center Road and goes for about 1,080 linear feet. This is also a reconstruction project that has an estimated cost of $960,564. The city is seeking a grant for $175,000 from the Medina County Transportation Improvement District (TID) funds and $200,000 from the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) Economic Development funds to help pay for the project. If Brunswick is successful in obtaining these grants, the city’s contribution will be $585,544.

North Carpenter Road is the single most expensive project on the proposed list for 2019. In total, it is estimated to cost more than $15 million when completed. The city began this work in 2018. While the state is picking up most of the expenses — roughly $9.7 million — Brunswick will pay $3,256,830.51 in local construction costs by the end of 2019. The county is adding in an additional 20 percent.

City Finance Director Todd Fischer has previously said this year’s budget also accounts for $160,000 in repair and resurfacing costs for Boyer Drive, which the city has been saving for since August 2012, and another $360,000 will go toward general road repairs and improvements.

In other news

City Council approved a resolution that allocated $280,000 to the police and fire departments to purchase radios for the new MARCS Radio system that the city has recently begun using.

The fire department will be purchasing a total of 33 radios and the police department will be purchasing 79 radios. The radios will be purchased through a company called Vasu Communications Inc.

Contact reporter Alyssa Alfano at aalfano@medina-gazette.com.


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