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Horsepower pulls animal to safety in Sharon Township

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    Sadie, stuck in about 4 feet of mud, was rescued by the Sharon Township Fire Department on Sunday.

    PHOTO COURTESY OF SHARON TOWNSHIP FIRE DEPARTMENT

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    Sadie, stuck in about 4 feet of mud, was rescued by the Sharon Township Fire Department on Sunday.

    PHOTO COURTESY OF SHARON TOWNSHIP FIRE DEPARTMENT

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    Sadie, who was rescued from about 4 feet of mud, is taken back to her barn in Sharon Township on Sunday.

    PHOTO COURTESY OF SHARON TOWNSHIP FIRE DEPARTMENT

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SHARON TWP. — The Sharon Township Fire Department has rescued several animals through the years, but Sunday’s distress call for a horse stuck in the mud was a first.

At about 7:30 p.m., attorney J. Jeffrey Holland, who lives in the 6200 block of State Road, said his draft horse got stuck shoulders deep in the mud. Holland said the horse was just out walking on the property when it encountered the murky situation.

Holland, the horse’s owner, said he first called his neighbor, Maggie Hobson, who is a lieutenant with Sharon Township fire, and she came over to help. Hobson then called in the additional assistance from other members of the fire department when she saw how deep the animal was stuck.

According to a report, the horse was stuck in about 4 feet of mud.

“Mud does cause suction,” fire Chief Rob Haas said Monday.

He said the best way to counteract that sucking action is to add water. But that is not how firefighters pulled off this equestrian rescue.

Haas, who wasn’t at the scene, said his firefighters were able to wrap a fire hose around the horse, hook the hose to a tractor placed in low gear and dragged out the horse. The entire rescue took about an hour.

“I wasn’t looking at my watch,” Holland said. “It went by kind of fast.”

The average draft horse weighs about 1,100 pounds.

Haas said his department has never had to rescue a horse. But he said he’s been told by a local veterinarian that it “happens fairly often.”

After Sadie, a rescue horse, was pulled out of the mud, the mare walked back to the barn and ate.

“She’s doing great,” said Holland, whose family owned Rustic Hills Country Club. “We’re very fortunate to have such great people in Medina Country.”

Haas said there was a vet at the scene in case Sadie was injured.

Holland said he owns two horses and has taken in two rescue horses.

“We’re very pleased with the good outcome,” he said. “We were trying to pull her to safety.”

Contact reporter Bob Finnan at (330) 721-4049 or rfinnan@medina-gazette.com.
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